Legal Information in a Background Check

Background Checks. Although the word may seem scary, this is not something to be feared. In fact, it’s a normal part of life, and at some point everybody will have a background check done on them. There are a multitude of reasons why a background check could be done reasons varying from a new job, before moving into a new apartment or condominium and more. And although you have no control what appears on the background check report (your history is your past, and there’s very little you can do to change the past), you do have the right to protect your privacy by knowing what is legal and what is not legal information on a background check report.

A background check usually contains a lot of different information. Most of the information is compliant with the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) but sometimes you may find information that seems either out of place or unnecessary. There are people that legally can have all the information, for example, any jobs involving the government, FBI or police. In those cases, the government is allowed to know all information because it is in regards to national safety. In all other cases where the government is not involved, access to that information is denied. An important step to ensuring your privacy is by asking what information is requested on the background check. If the employer or renter (or whomever) gives an unclear answer or disregards the question all together, have them write down exactly what information they are looking for. That way, if something on the background check shows up that was not originally communicated; you are able to take the appropriate steps to clear things up.

Every company has different policies on what information they need. The general standard check can include any or all of the following; felony and misdemeanor arrest and conviction charges, education and professional license verifications, employment checks, social security verifications, sexual offender checks, motor vehicle reports, federal criminal checks, reference checks, civil litigation, OIG database, federal bankruptcy and many others. There is also an industry standard to how long this information can be used for hire. The FCRA also states that a company can go back seven years for hire. Any older information is declared illegal and must be discarded.

If by some off chance you do end up finding information there are steps you can take. The best step is to have a conversation with the other party, and for the most part, any problem that you may have can be solved easily. Furthermore, if the problem still hasn’t been solved, try consulting a lawyer. If the information provided is old and past the seven year scope, there is legal action that can be taken.

When a company or person requires a background check it is important to know your rights regarding your privacy. If you suspect that there is illegal information on your background check report, there actions you can take so that you are protected.

Asbestos Mesothelioma Legal Information and You?

Facts you need to know regarding asbestos mesothelioma legal information? Asbestos is classified as a naturally sourced mineral. It’s been utilised for many years for assorted reasons such as in building components, small appliances, insulating materials and vehicle components. It’s used in shipyards, manufacturing plants, railroads, industrial facilities as well as in other places. It is known as extremely resistant against deterioration and is a great insulator next to high temperature.

However, asbestos has some properties that make it harmful to any person handling it. It has been known to cause of various cancers, such as lung cancer and mesothelioma. The latter is a rare form of cancer, also known as asbestos cancer. The mesothelium is the lining of some cavities and organs. The mesothelia most affected by exposure to asbestos are those of the heart, lungs and intestines.

According to statistics, Mesothelioma kills about 3000 people annually. This kills 3% to 5% more males than ladies. This is mainly because men constitute a larger portion of the workforce than women. This cancer also has a latency period. It takes a long time to develop, sometimes even decades.

Individuals with Mesothelioma have numerous legitimate options to obtain settlement. Affected persons are encouraged to file lawsuits for compensation. There are two types of asbestos cancer lawsuits: personal injury and wrongful death. In the former, a person with mesothelioma cancer files a claim for damages, ranging from loss of wages, past and present medical expenses and pain and suffering. In the latter, survivors of a deceased victim of this cancer may file a wrongful death claim, for the premature death of their kin. The claim covers earnings, companionship, protection as well as treatment providers. In the US, regulations pertaining to these lawsuits differ from one state to another.

For many years, companies that used asbestos never educated their employees on the risks of dealing with this well-known carcinogen. Consequently, many employees contracted diseases due to overexposure, while companies got away with their negligent behavior. Today, however, things are different. Persons that worked in such companies can now file lawsuits seeking compensation, even though they no longer work there anymore. Compensations from such claims are large enough for the patient and their family as well.

In addition, the US government protects people with disabilities. Patients suffering from Mesothelioma cancer are eligible for disability compensation. They are able to secure compensation by submitting a social security disability lawsuit claim, seeking financial help. They may also pursue a similar disability claim privately with an insurance company, through their employer’s insurance policy, or an existing life insurance policy. In some instances, health insurance should provide monetary compensation to help offset some of their medical costs. In the event the insurance company declines to do so, one may file a lawsuit for unmerited insurance practice.

It is advisable to seek the services of a lawyer for asbestos mesothelioma legal information who is well acquainted with similar lawsuits and who is able to work around the legal intricacies of such cases. Victims of this disease no longer need to suffer unnecessarily as there are many legal options available to them now.

Copyright (c) 2010 Daniel K Voyles

A Rabies Dog Bite – Assessment and Legal Information

Thanks to movie dramatization we all have a general knowledge of what rabid dogs look like. The glassy eyes, the foaming mouth, the uncontrollable aggression…

Despite the widespread knowledge of the existence of rabies, most people don’t know the full details and are often left wondering how to handle rabies (and if it is even present at all).

This article looks to explore how rabies dog bites occur, what treatment can be done, and what legal liabilities are at stake.

Please understand this article is not a substitute for medical treatment and assumes no responsibility for the proper care and diagnosis of the illness.

Where Do Dogs Get Rabies?

Most cases of rabies in dogs come from bites from wild animals. The most common animals to carry rabies are skunks, raccoons, bats, and foxes.

What Are the Symptoms of Rabies in Dogs?

Rabies generally go through three stages in dogs. The first is called the predomal stage and generally lasts 2-3 days. Symptoms during this phase often include fever, chewing at bite site, and behavioral changes.

The next phase is called the furious stage and lasts 2-4 days. The furious stage is the one most people are familiar with, and is associated with aggressive behavior, barking, disorientation, and attacks.

The final phase is called the paralytics stage and can last 2-4 days. In this stage the animal suffers from the oft-mentioned mouth foaming, paralysis of limbs, and dropped jaw. This is followed by coma and death.

How Likely Is It That A Dog Has Rabies?

Sometimes people get confused that an aggressive dog automatically has rabies. This is not the case. As you’ll notice in the cycle mentioned above, rabies penetrates a dog quickly and mainly occurs when the dog has been bitten by a rabid wild animal. These circumstances are less prevalent than people are led to believe.

Nevertheless, if you’ve been bitten by a dog, it is always wise to take as many precautions as possible.

Assessing the Bite for Rabies

The most important step for assessing a bite is getting in contact with the dogs owners. From there you can discuss when their last rabies shot occurred (if at all), and if the animal recently had any fights with wild animals or has been experiencing changes in behavior.

If the dog is a stray you will want to contact animal control asap and have them locate the dog.

Legal Rights of a Bite Victim

When bitten by a dog that may be rabid, medical treatment is your primary concern. However, once the animal has been properly diagnosed by a professional and your health is on track for recovery, you need to concern yourself with legal rights.

If you’ve been bitten by a dog, rabid or not, you may have the right to pursue for damages. The most important piece advice in this process is to get in contact with a skilled dog bite injury lawyer right away. Early in the process he/she will help you obtain the information you need from the offending party and avoid many of the common traps that insurance companies and dog owners will try to catch you in.

Legal Placement Services: Information Regarding Court Reporters

While most people might not think that The Wild Wild West, Billy the Kid, and Wild Bill Hickok might not have anything to do with reporting or legal placement services, in a way they do. What they have in common is their timing, because 1893 was when the first idea of coming up with a national court reporting association (NCRA) came to mind. The idea came to fruition in 1899 in Chicago where the National Shorthand Reporters Association (NSRA) held their first meeting. About the year of 1927, the NSRA set their first code of ethics and allowed women to take a more active role in the profession.

Enough about the history, some people who might be considering this career path might be more curious about the types of court reporters there are and the certifications required. The information below will describe these two pieces of information about court reporters.

Types of Court Reporters

A court reporter is often referred to as a shorthand reporter, a law reporter, or a stenotype operator, all of which have the same definition of transcribing the happenings of trials. No matter what the profession is called, there are different career paths the professional can advance toward with the right training. Some of the different types of court reporters that require this training include Registered Professional Reporters (RPR), Registered Merit Reporters (RMR), Registered Diplomat Reporters (RDR), Certified Realtime Reporters (CRR), Certified Broadcast Captioner (CBC), Certified Legal Video Specialists (CLVS), and Certified Program Evaluators (CPE).

Those who think technology would eliminate the profession are obviously wrong because while technology provides a sense of better accuracy those recordings or videos still need to be transcribed. Many court reporters choose to work as freelancers because along with working for law firms, they can work for television companies by transcribing captions for the hearing-impaired.

Types of Required Certifications

The Nationally Recognized Certification has been administered to court reporters since 1937. Additionally, the RPR has replaced the licensing exam (also known as the state certification) in 22 states. As previously mentioned there are many different types of reporters, but some of them are simply different levels of certification:

  1. Registered Professional Reporters (RPR) – The first level of certification that holds about 11,000 certified professionals.
  2. Registered Merit Reporters (RMR) – 2,100 professionals claim this second level certification spot.
  3. Registered Diplomate Reporters (RDR) – 450 have reached this third certification level.

Becoming certified might be challenging with all the different accuracy and type-speed requirements, but it provides a number of benefits. For one, certifications give professionals more opportunities because it shows the professionals’ level of commitment to their profession. It also gives them the opportunity to build their skillset and enhance their credibility.

While the process of becoming a court reporter might be frustrating and challenging, it has its benefits and many different career options. If this article has not provided enough information for professionals who are looking to pursue a career in this profession, the interested professional should contact local legal placement services or NCRA.org for more information.

Consumer Law Report Blasts For-Profit Colleges for Private-Label Student Loans

A new report issued in January by the National Consumer Law Center accuses for-profit colleges of saddling their students with unregulated private-label student loans that force these students into high interest rates, excessive debt, and predatory lending terms that make it difficult for these students to succeed.

The report, entitled “Piling It On: The Growth of Proprietary School Loans and the Consequences for Students,” discusses the boom over the past three years in private student loan programs offered directly by schools rather than by third-party lenders. These institutional loans are offered by so-called “proprietary schools” – for-profit colleges, career schools, and vocational training programs.

Federal vs. Private Education Loans

Most loans for students will be one of two types: government-funded federal student loans, guaranteed and overseen by the U.S. Department of Education; or non-federal private student loans, issued by banks, credit unions, and other private-sector lenders. (Some students may also be able to take advantage of state-funded college loans available in some states for resident students.)

Private student loans, unlike federal undergraduate loans, are credit-based loans, requiring the student borrower to have adequate credit history and income, or else a creditworthy co-signer.

The Beginnings of Proprietary School Loans

Following the financial crisis in 2008 that was spurred, in part, by the lax lending practices that drove the subprime mortgage boom, lenders across all industries instituted more stringent credit requirements for private consumer loans and lines of credit.

Many private student loan companies stopped offering their loans to students who attend for-profit colleges, as these students have historically had weaker credit profiles and higher default rates than students at nonprofit colleges and universities.

These moves made it difficult for proprietary schools to comply with federal financial aid regulations that require colleges and universities to receive at least 10 percent of their revenue from sources other than federal student aid.

To compensate for the withdrawal of private student loan companies from their campuses, some for-profit colleges began to offer proprietary school loans to their students. Proprietary school loans are essentially private-label student loans, issued and funded by the school itself rather than by a third-party lender.

Proprietary Loans as Default Traps

The NCLC report charges that these proprietary school loans contain predatory lending terms, charge high interest rates and large loan origination fees, and have low underwriting standards, which allow students with poor credit histories and insufficient income to borrow significant sums of money that they’re in little position to be able to repay.

In addition, these proprietary loans often require students to make payments while they’re still in school, and the loans can carry very sensitive default provisions. A single late payment can result in a loan default, along with the student’s expulsion from the academic program. Several for-profit schools will withhold transcripts from borrowers whose proprietary loans are in default, making it nearly impossible for these students to resume their studies elsewhere without starting over.

The NCLC report notes that more than half of proprietary college loans go into default and are never repaid.

Recommendations for Reform

Currently, consumers are afforded few protections from proprietary lenders. Proprietary school loans aren’t subject to the federal oversight that regulates credit products originated by most banks and credit unions.

Moreover, some proprietary schools claim that their private student loans aren’t “loans” at all, but rather a form of “consumer financing” – a distinction, NCLC charges, that’s “presumably an effort to evade disclosure requirements such as the federal Truth in Lending Act” as well as a semantic maneuver meant to skirt state banking regulations.

The authors of the NCLC report make a series of recommendations for reforming proprietary school loans. The recommendations advocate for tough federal oversight of both proprietary and private student loans.

Among the NCLC’s favored reforms are requirements that private student loan companies and proprietary lenders adhere to federal truth-in-lending laws; regulations that prohibit proprietary loans from counting toward a school’s required percentage of non-federal revenue; implementing tracking of private and proprietary loan debt and default rates in the National Student Loan Data System, which currently tracks only federal education loans; and centralized oversight to ensure that for-profit schools can’t disguise their true default rates on their private-label student loans.

Other proposed reforms the NCLC supports include modification of federal bankruptcy laws and expansion of federal college loan debt relief programs.

The NCLC argues for a modification of current bankruptcy laws that would allow student borrowers to discharge onerous student loan debts in a bankruptcy petition without having to meet the current, nearly-impossible-to-satisfy “undue hardship” tests. Amidst more relaxed bankruptcy rules and strengthened non-bankruptcy alternatives, the NCLC maintains, fewer borrowers would find themselves hopelessly mired in student loan debt.